Manning Regional Healthcare Center

Iowa Donor Network is Grateful a Record Numbers of Iowans are Transforming Lives

North Liberty, IA – In this season of thanks Iowa Donor Network (IDN) is incredibly thankful that for the fourth year in a row, a record number of Iowans have transformed lives through organ donation and transplantation. Already in 2021, Iowa Donor Network has recovered the highest number of organs for transplant from the most donors in the state’s history. As of November 22, 130 deceased organ donors in the state of Iowa have generously given 312 organs for transplant. Iowa Donor Network works closely with our healthcare partners across the state to maximize donation opportunities.
Donation Facts“Iowa Donor Network is incredibly grateful to our donors and their families who put their trust in us and saved lives by saying “Yes” to donation. We are also grateful for the support and collaboration of our healthcare partners without whom we could not meet our mission of working together transforming lives through organ and tissue donation,” said Heather Butterfield, Director of Strategic Communications at Iowa Donor Network.
Iowa Donor Network has made great strides already in 2021 towards reducing the transplant waiting list, but there are still more than 100,000 people in the United States in need of a life-saving organ transplant, including 600 in Iowa. A single organ donor can save up to eight lives and a single tissue donor can enhance the lives of 50-300 people. Anyone can register as an organ, eye, and tissue donor, regardless of age or medical history. To join the donor registry or to learn more, please visit www.IowaDonorNetwork.org.

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Mental Health IS an Issue, Even in Rural Communities

Distinct mental health differences are evident when comparing rural and urban residents. While mental illnesses have a similar prevalence in both environments, the circumstances and access to treatment look different. According to The National Rural Health Association (NRHA), rural residents face more obstacles in obtaining behavioral health services. 

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Blackwell Named Outstanding Employee

When Amy Blackwell envisioned her career back in college, she initially saw herself as an elementary school teacher. But after changing her major, working a full-time job, starting a family, and running an in-home daycare, she decided to go back to school for her Administrative Office professional degree and eventually found her home at The Recovery Center at Manning Regional Healthcare Center.