What is Considered Alcohol Abuse?

Brad Madsen

By Bradley Madsen, Recovery Clinical Coordinator  

Summer is here and that means more people are out socializing and enjoying a beverage or two. However, have you ever wondered what constitutes drinking too much? Alcohol abuse is defined as “the habitual misuse of alcohol”, meaning that a person consumes excessive amounts of alcohol.

Here is a pop quiz. For each question you answer “yes,” give yourself a point.

1. Have you ever set out to have ‘a quick drink or two’ but ended up having more drinks than you intended? Or did you stay at the bar drinking past the time you said you’d be home for dinner?
2. Have you ever thought “I really want/need to cut down on my drinking”, but struggled to do so?
3. Have you ever spent more time drinking alcohol or recovering from drinking than you would like?
4. Do you ever crave or have a strong desire to have a drink?
5. Have you missed major role obligations (work, school, or home) more than once because you were impaired or busy drinking?
6. Do you continue to use alcohol despite persistent or recurrent social (or interpersonal) problems caused or made worse by drinking alcohol?
7. Have you continued to drink despite knowing you have persistent, or recurrent mental or physical health problems caused or made worse by alcohol use?
8. Have you given up or reduced social, occupational, or recreational activities because of alcohol use?
9. Have you used alcohol when it was dangerous to do so? (Drinking and driving or drinking despite liver problems).
10. Have you noticed that you have developed a tolerance to alcohol? (It takes more alcohol to feel buzzed than it did in the past. Or you notice you can drink more now without feeling as impaired as you might have in the past).
11. Do you ever feel ill when you don’t drink for a couple of days?

These questions represent the diagnostic criteria for alcohol use disorders as defined by the DSM-5 (Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition)

Scoring:
2-3 “yes” answers – You may have a mild alcohol use disorder.
4-5 “yes” answers – You likely have a moderate alcohol use disorder.
6+ “yes” answers – You likely have a severe alcohol use disorder.

If you (or someone you know) meet the criteria for an alcohol use disorder, you aren’t alone. According to the NIH, one in eight Americans meet the criteria for alcohol use disorder. Does this mean you are an ‘alcoholic’? Not necessarily, but it does mean that you are putting yourself at risk to develop alcoholism.

If you or someone you care about has problems with alcohol (or other substances), help is available locally. The sooner a person can get help, the better the long-term chance for recovery. Alcoholism is a disease, not a moral failing, a choice, or weakness. If you feel that you need help or guidance, reach out to your physician, or contact the Recovery Center at (712) 655-2300.

The Recovery Center at MRHC is a 16-bed, co-ed chemical dependency facility located in Manning. Services include detoxification, residential treatment, outpatient treatment and consultations or evaluations. Recovery Center staff have adapted treatments to meet the most pressing or newly emergent addiction issues, from alcoholism to the influx of meth to the abuse of prescription painkillers. For nearly four decades, staff have consistently helped clients take their first step toward healthy, drug and alcohol-free lifestyles.

For more information about the Recovery Center in Manning, visit www.manningrecoverycenter.com.

Manning Recovery Center Celebrates 40th Anniversary

Recovery Center 40th Celebration

The Recovery Center at Manning Regional Healthcare Center is celebrating 40 years of providing substance abuse recovery services in western Iowa.

“This is an incredible milestone for our facility and the many clients we have served throughout the years,” said Recovery Center Director, Taya Vonnahme, MSN, RN, ARNP, tCADC.

To celebrate, all friends of recovery are invited to join The Recovery Center staff on August 6, 2022, at the Manning Hausbarn-Heritage Park Konferenz Center from 11:00 am – 3:00 pm. This free event will include a luncheon, welcome from the Recovery Center Director, testimonials of recovery, and networking among all in attendance.

“The Recovery Center has had such an impact on not only the clients, but also their friends, family, and communities. We want to celebrate that success, continue to be advocates for substance abuse, spread awareness that treatment is available in Manning, and share how it has had a lifechanging impact on so many people,” said Vonnahme.

To RSVP to the 40th Anniversary Celebration, call (712) 655-2300.

Recovery Center History

The Manning General Hospital Substance Abuse Treatment Unit (SAT Unit) opened in December 1982 after a study of the area found that substance abuse treatment services were needed. The Iowa Department of Health issued the Center a Certificate of Need, and clients were first accepted for residential treatment on January 17, 1983. The facility has grown and increased its services since.

When the hospital moved to its current location in 2014, the Recovery Center moved as well. The new space allowed for more natural light in patient rooms and space for indoor and outdoor recreation. Today the Recovery Center provides services including residential and outpatient treatment, detoxification, and education.

Initially there were only five staff members, however the Recovery Center’s staff now consists of a multi-disciplinary team including a medical director, an administrative assistant, 24-hour nursing services, four licensed substance abuse counselors, two full-time and four part-time counselor techs, a nurse care coordinator, family therapist, licensed clinical coordinator, psychologist, and a director.

To learn more about Recovery Center services, call (712) 655-2300.

The Recovery Center at Manning Regional Healthcare Center is a 16-bed, co-ed chemical dependency facility located in Manning. The Recovery Center has trusted experts on staff who can provide individuals the right medical care, behavioral therapy, and social support to enable a healthy lifestyle free from drugs and alcohol. For more information about the Recovery Center, visit www.manningrecoverycenter.com.

Prime for Life Courses Offered at Manning Recovery Center

Prime for life classes at MRHC

The Recovery Center at Manning Regional Healthcare Center is now offering Prime for Life classes (OWI course for the Iowa DOT) on the third weekend of every month on Friday and Saturday for seven hours.

“We are always looking to expand the services we offer in our local community and surrounding areas,” said Recovery Center Director, Taya Vonnahme, MSN, RN, ARNP, tCADC. “We are seeing a high need for this class and want to ensure our community needs are being met.”

The Prime for Life course can be taken to meet DOT requirements for OWIs in Iowa or by anyone who wants to learn more about drinking and driving for any reason. The classes will cover the following topics:

  • Understanding how alcohol and drug-related problems develop
  • How to prevent problems
  • Why addicts need support

“Our instructors are not only certified in Prime for Life but are also licensed addiction counselors who teach in a manner that is conducive for anyone striving for sobriety,” Vonnahme shared.

2022 Prime for Life course dates include:
July 15-16
August 19-20
September 16-17
October 14-15
November 18-19
December 16-17

Call (712) 655-2300 to sign up for a Prime for Life class.

The Recovery Center at MRHC is a 16-bed, co-ed chemical dependency facility located in Manning. Services include detoxification, residential and outpatient treatment, and education. For more information about the Recovery Center, visit www.manningrecoverycenter.com.

Alcoholism Impacts Everyone

Addiction impacts everyone

Brad MadsenBy Bradley Madsen, Recovery Clinical Coordinator

You may think you are too strong, or somehow immune to alcoholism. After all, ‘things like alcoholism happen to OTHER people, it can’t happen to ME.’ But it can. Working in the addiction field, I’ve met hundreds of people who once believed that alcoholism could never happen to them, until it did.

‘But I’m different, I’m a successful/professional person.’ Alcoholism doesn’t care what you do for a living or how much money you have in the bank. It doesn’t care what race you are or how educated you are. If you have recent patterns of abusing alcohol, you are at risk. Take these statistics for example:

  • Lawyers: One in five attorneys struggle with drinking problems – twice the national rate.
  • Healthcare: About 4% of healthcare workers reported heavy alcohol consumption in the prior month. A 2014 study found that 15.3% of physicians struggled with alcohol abuse or dependence.
  • Construction: 16.5% report drinking heavily in recent weeks.
  • Hospitality/Food Service: 11.8% report drinking heavily in recent weeks.
  • Management: Roughly 9% of ‘white collar’ professionals in management positions reported heavy alcohol use in the past month.
  • Real Estate: 5% report drinking heavily in recent weeks.
  • Finance/Insurance: 7.4% report drinking heavily in recent weeks.
  • Education: 4.7% report drinking heavily in recent weeks.
  • Farming: Alcohol abuse among farmers is as high as 32% (over 3 in 10).

Addiction impacts everyone

I hope this illustrates the point that alcoholism truly does not discriminate.

Alcohol Awareness Month is a national public health awareness campaign sponsored by the National Council for Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) that takes place every April. It was developed to increase awareness and understanding of the causes and treatment of one of our nation’s top public health problems: alcoholism.

If you or someone you care about has problems with alcohol (or other substances), help is available. The sooner a person can get help, the better the long-term chance for recovery. Alcoholism is a disease, not a moral failing, a choice, or weakness. If you feel that you need help or guidance, reach out to your physician, or contact the Recovery Center at (712) 655-2300. Recovery is possible.

The Recovery Center at MRHC is a 16-bed, co-ed chemical dependency facility located in Manning. Services include detoxification, residential treatment, outpatient treatment and consultations or evaluations. For more information about the Recovery Center, visit www.manningrecoverycenter.com.